Posts Tagged ‘ohio bass fishing tips’

Swim that Jig When Ohio Bass Fishing

Monday, October 15th, 2012

When Ohio bass fishing and the bass are biting and aggressive you might want to try a white jig with a double twister tail as a trailer. A jig acts more natural and realistic than a crankbait or spinnerbait.

You can skip it under docks, let it fall over a limb, and it won’t get hung up like a crankbait. It is also great for catching big bass in the grass. The jig is best in the summer and fall and can be fished shallow. Some anglers, including myself, when Ohio bass fishing, fish it so shallow that it is visible all the time. I use the swimming jig when the water is 5 feet or less. White seems to be the most productive for me by far and it’s easier to see.

Try casting the jig out and when reeling it back in shake and jiggle the rod tip on the retrieve. That doesn’t mean to retrieve the jig slow like a worm but keep steadily reeling it kind of fast. I also use a heavy braided line to be able to pull the big bass out of the cover. I like Fireline the best in at least 60 pound test. My favorite size jig is a 1/2 ounce white jig with a twin tail Mr. Twister trailer. I also like KVD’s Swim Jigs in Shad color.

Jigs are a favorite of mine to catch big bass, once you try this technique I think it will become one of your favorite Ohio bass fishing lures.

KVD Swim Jig

Where To Find The Big Bass In Central and South Central Ohio.

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

Where To Find The Big Bass In Central and South Central Ohio.

When I go looking for big bass, I don’t go to the usual places like Hoover, Alum Creek, Buckeye and the big lakes that have a lot of pressure. I go to places that most people have never heard of, let alone fish there.

I’m talking about Clouse Lake, St. Joseph Lake, The Strip Pits By New Lexington and the out of the way places that have less anglers and less fishing pressure. I’m talking about places where’s it’s not too unusual to catch a couple of 7 plus pound bass in the same day.

The reason I mention the places above to fish is because they are located fairly close to one another and because they hold big bass. Take Clouse Lake for example, it is located on route 668 near Somerset, Ohio. A friend and I was fishing there and he was using a fly rod and caught a 6 1/2 pounder then another 6 pounder within an hour. I have seen dozens of 5 pound plus fish come out of Clouse. I have even caught 5 pounders below the damn in a little pool of water and in the creek there.

I always thought St. Joseph Lake was just the backend of Clouse Lake but found out differently. Now, I’m not going to tell you I caught any 10 pound plus fish in St. Joseph Lake but I am going to tell you I had the best fishing day of my life there. 76 bass in 4 hours all between 3/4 pound to 3 pounds. Believe me, it’s not always like that but it was for me one day. If you take State Route 13 south out of Somerset, you’ll see a sign that says oldest Catholic Church in Ohio. Turn there and follow it past a church you see on your right, before you turn at the curve going left, you’ll see another gravel road to the right. Take it down hill until you come to a culvert. The lake is at the end of the culvert if you follow it out going west.

Let’s talk about the strip pits by New Lexington. I have seen quite a few big bass and bigger catfish come from these pits. A friend of mine caught two 6 plus pound bass there within 30 minutes. The water is fairly clear in some of the pits and pretty deep too. The pits I like to fish are best fished in a small boat, like a jon boat. The way I go to the pits is I take State Route 93 South to Marietta Road and make a left. Go to the first main cross road and turn left again. You’ll go and see a road to the right, if you look back over your shoulder there should be a strip pit on your left. Turn right and you’ll have 4 or 5 strip pits to fish on that one road. Again, I suggest a small boat as there isn’t much of a ramp at any of these pits. If nothing else the scenery is beautiful there. High cliffs, pretty water and some deep pits with big bass. These are privately owned now and you need permission to fish these pits.

One of the biggest bass I ever hooked in Ohio was at a little impoundments on Big Inch Road near Somerset. It is located off 668 before you get to Clouse Lake coming from Somerset. I was fishing top water and this bass came up and grabbed the mouse I was using and started the battle, I hate to say this but I got excited and loss the big bass. I do have a 12 pound 14 ounce bass on my wall, so I know what a 10 pound bass looks like and I’m telling you, this was at least 10 pounds of mean ole bass and to say the least he didn’t want to get caught.

Try the places above this spring and let me know how you did. You can send me a picture of the big bass you catch at charles.e.white at gmail.com and I’ll post your picture at our website along with your name. You can also send me a note to thank me for telling you about these places if you didn’t know about them beforehand. :)

Until Next Week.

Good Fishing To You!

Charles

http://www.bassfishingweekly.com

Is Your Lure Matching What The Bass IS Eating?

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

So many of us are guilty of doing this and sometimes there is a good reason, I guess……but here is my question……

If the bass’ main diet is something that is 2 or 4 inches….why are you throwing a 12 inch worm or even a 6 or 7 inch lure? Lets say they are eating a 4 inch shad or crayfish and you know that….why not throw something that resembles that size?

Now I have caught bass on large lures, don’t get me wrong, but if the majority of fish are eating smaller bait, try to imitate that bait. You will catch more fish usually.

As most of my close friends know, I fish with a green and white Scum Frog quite a bit in the lily pads. I don’t think for one minute that the bass believe the frog is a frog, I believe they think it is a shad when they see the white belly and it’s about the same length as most shad in the lakes I fish. I have seen these little shad flop around on top of the pads then a bass strikes at them, so I thought when I seen these lures with the white belly that they were a good imitation. Apparently, I was right!

Wherever you fish, try to imitate what the bass is eating.